Who is afraid of comics?

by Karolina Przeklas

Violent protests erupted last September when Charlie Hebdo’s French cartoon was published which “ridiculed” the prophet Mohammed. A talk this week investigated why comics and cartoons have been targeted by censorship and why they create moral panics worldwide.

London’s freelance journalist, Paul Gravett, curator and lecturer has been involved in comics publishing and promotion since 1981. His talk explained the unsurprising journey through the history of comics and the reasons why for these amazing works of art have been subjected to prosecution and in many cases destroyed.

Paul Gravett - Who is afraid of comics?

Who is afraid of comics?

“Who is Afraid of Comics”, held at the Central Library in Islington as part of a Word2013 Festival.

It’s not who is afraid

“It’s who uses that fear of comics, rather purposely because it’s a very good way to distant attention from other, probably much more serious things that are going on in the society, like unemployment or god knows what to have a focus on something like comics.” – said Gravett.

Check out children’s and young persons harmful publications act from 1955 – still in use today

Mohammed Cartoon

In September, French cartoon caused outrage in the Muslim community worldwide after Hebdo’s controversial intake on the life of the prophet Mohammed. Hebdo newspaper was calling itself a “defender of free speech and a denouncer of religious backwardness”.

 French magazine editor threatened over Mohammad cartoon

huff.to/Up8oYK

— Huffington Post (@HuffingtonPost) September 22, 2012

1001 comics you must

read before you die

Check out Paul Gravett’s 1001 comics you must read before you die collection of comics from around the world.

1001 comics you must read before you die
Word2013 Festival takes place across the Islington borough for the whole month of May. With over 50 events to choose from you get a chance to celebrate reading, writing and freedom of expression. A range of events, exhibitions  and performances showcasing some of Islington writers, artists and organisation.
word2013

Word2013 Festival

The project has been developed in partnership with Islington Library and Heritage Service; Islington Arts Service; All Change and Free Word.

Islington Community Theatre – Word Festival – Flash Mob 2012 from Roman Sheppard Dawson on Vimeo.

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London Arts

Graffiti: Art or Not

 

As Londoners we are a diverse bunch. We have different taste’s in things like food, (although we all love a curry) music, and clothes.We like to moan about the weather and act surprised when theirs another doomsday story on Eastender’s. But one thing that  divides the most opinion is the graffiti on the walls of our city.

We can look as far back as the ancient Egyptians for early signs of graffiti, although we now know them as hieroglyphics its was still essentially writings and drawings on a wall. Graffiti artist or ‘graffers’ as they are known to their peers take their art extremely seriously, to have your ‘tag’ seen all over a city is a huge achievement. Never advertising a product, they are promoting themselves as artist. To the real hardcore ‘graffers’ this is tantamount to a classic artist having their pieces up in the Tate Modern Gallery.

Graffiti is huge on a global scale. From London to California to Bombay you will find spectacular examples of graffiti.

Piece By Poch, Rock - Mumbai (India)

A stunning piece of graffiti in Mumbai and above a huge memorial piece from Compton, California.

A frame from the banned video game.

A graffiti artist putting the final touches on his piece in Australia.

In London the range of graffiti is vast. At present we are seeing a creative birth with young artist showcasing their talent on our historic walls. As lots of people strive to become the next Banksy we are witnessing more simple styles of graffiti as opposed to the ones that look like they took as long as the Sistine Chapel given the sizes and amount of colors used.

Here is a reel of graffiti that Roam Magazine put together for your pleasure.

Here are a few more interesting videos about Graffiti in London.

Here are a few website on Graffiti, if you’d like to learn more on the subject.

http://streetartlondon.co.uk/

http://www.ldngraffiti.co.uk/blog/

http://www.thelondonvandal.com/tag/london-graffiti/

The London Book Fair 2013


london-book-fair1

The London Book Fair is a trade event and global market place for negotiations with an advertising of books, videos, movies and digital productions. The London Book Fair opened its doors to public at Earls Court from 15-17 April 2013. Turkey is designated as Market Focus Country for this year’s London Book Fair festival.

London Book Fair welcomed Turkey to the one of the world’s biggest publishing events of the year in the United Kingdom. Turkey, as the Market Focus country had the spotlight on publishing trade links with international and the UK professionals. The event also showed various publishing industry opportunities from all around the world.

Festival guest writer Zahira Hussain, from SOAS university, said that “it is great to welcome different Market focus countries every year in the city of London. In 2012, the Market focus country was China and this year is Turkey as a rapidly growing country in the region. I  love Turkish literature and it is absolutely amazing to meet with our favorite authors from Turkey in our hometown.”

Market Focus 2013 Introduction to Turkey:

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Turkey Market Focus of 2013 

London Book Fair brought nearly 20 different writers from Turkey to participate in this astonishing organization.

Turkish authors have had several discussions on Turkey, feminism, women’s right, Kurdish problem and all the other social conflicts in the country. Readers had given a chance to ask many questions to publishers, academics, writers and designers.

35% of Turkish books are translated to foreign languages and the aim of this year’s event was to exhibit Turkish literature to the UK readers from historical narratives to contemporary  literature.

LBF 2013 visitor London School of Economics graduate James McCain told us; “this is an absolutely fantastic opportunity to see Turkish traditional literatures in London. I read several Turkish books, so that I have a bit of taste of Turkish literature beforehand. I also finished reading Orhan Pamuk’s Museum of Innocence  and  would like to visit Istanbul to see his special museum on this book.”

London Book Fair festival promoted Turkey’s literature with many inspirational writers, such as Orhan Pamuk, winner of the 2006 Nobel prize winner of literature and Elif Shafak, is an award-winning novelist of The Forty Rules of Love.

#visiting #london #bookfair #festival #via #instagram

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As London Book Fair Author of the Day on Tuesday 4th of April 2013, Elif Shafak:

London Book Fair – Earls Court

Local Map & Guide

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Follow N. Seyda Yilmaz on Twitter @nseydayilmaz